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The role of social embeddedness for remaining in non-desired workplaces and mental health consequences: Results from Scania Public Health Cohort
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
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2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 334-343Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: The aim of the study was to investigate the role of social embeddedness on and off the job in relation to remaining in non-desired workplaces (NDWs) and the development of mental health. Method: The study used questionnaire data from the Scania Public Health cohort (N=2410) that were collected in 2000 (T1), 2005 (T2) and 2010 (T3). Logistic regression models were calculated to probe how NDWs and social embeddedness factors measured at baseline (T1) related to NDWs five years later (T2), and to investigate how NDWs and social embeddedness factors at T2 related to poor mental health at T3. Synergy indices were calculated in both analyses to test for additive v. interactive effects between NDWs and social embeddedness factors on the outcomes. Results: NDWs at baseline and low social embeddedness on and off the job was associated with NDWs at T2. For those in a desired workplace, low support from co-workers as well as low workplace affinity increased the risk to be in an NDW at T2. NDWs and low social embeddedness also associated with impaired mental health (T3). For those in an NDW, low support from co-workers as well as low workplace affinity increased the risk of poor mental health at T3. Conclusions: This study underlines the importance of social embeddedness for NDWs and the development of poor mental health over time. Particularly low social support from co-workers and low workplace affinity seem to be risk factors for future experience of an NDW and impaired mental health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 47, no 3, p. 334-343
Keywords [en]
workplace non-preference, social embeddedness, social relations, off-the-job embeddedness, mental health, longitudinal study, cohort design
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-168707DOI: 10.1177/1403494818804090ISI: 000466373100007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-168707DiVA, id: diva2:1313890
Note

This work was funded by FORTE (Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare; Grant numbers 2013-1269 and 2012-0979, and the Medical Faculty at Lund University.

Available from: 2019-05-06 Created: 2019-05-06 Last updated: 2019-05-27Bibliographically approved

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