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Harms from a partner's drinking: an international study on adverse effects and reduced quality of life for women
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). La Trobe University, Australia.
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Number of Authors: 92019 (English)In: American journal of drug and alcohol abuse, ISSN 0095-2990, E-ISSN 1097-9891, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 170-178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Partners of heavy drinking individuals can be detrimentally affected as a result of their partner's drinking.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify the proportion of heterosexual intimate partner relationships with a heavy drinking male that resulted in reported alcohol-related harm and to investigate the impact of this on well-being in 9 countries.

Methods: This study used survey data from the Gender and Alcohol's Harm to Others (GENAHTO) Project on Alcohol's Harm to Others in 9 countries (10,613 female respondents, 7,091 with intimate live-in partners). Respondents were asked if their partners drinking had negatively affected them as well as questions on depression, anxiety, and satisfaction with life.

Results: The proportion of partnered respondents that reported having a harmful heavy drinking partner varied across countries, from 4% in Nigeria and the US to 33% in Vietnam. The most consistent correlate of experiencing harm was being oneself a heavy episodic drinker, most likely as a proxy measure for the acceptability of alcohol consumption in social circles. Women with a harmful heavy drinking partner reported significantly lower mean satisfaction with life than those with a partner that did not drink heavily.

Conclusions: Harms to women from heavy drinking intimate partners appear across a range of subgroups and impact on a wide range of women, at least demographically speaking. Women living with a heavy drinking spouse experience higher levels of anxiety and depression symptoms and lower satisfaction with life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 45, no 2, p. 170-178
Keywords [en]
Alcohol-related harm, intimate partner, spouse, cultural context
National Category
Substance Abuse
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-168386DOI: 10.1080/00952990.2018.1540632ISI: 000462091600007PubMedID: 30495983OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-168386DiVA, id: diva2:1314259
Available from: 2019-05-08 Created: 2019-05-08 Last updated: 2019-05-08Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
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