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Divergent concurrent and lagged effects of the reciprocal relation between work-nonwork interactions and sleep disturbance
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
Number of Authors: 22019 (English)In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 42, no 3, article id zsy255Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Study Objectives

Work-nonwork interactions and sleep disturbances are found to be important predictors of well-being and job performance outcomes. However, little is known about the mutual interrelations of the interactions between life domains and disturbed sleep over short and long periods of time.

Methods

In total, 4079 representative individuals of the Swedish working population completed three subsequent waves of surveys with a time interval of 2 years (i.e. longitudinal design).

Results

Concurrent, cross-lagged, and reverse directionality effects were simultaneously examined using autoregressive longitudinal path analysis. Contemporarily, interference between work and nonwork increased sleep disturbances, whereas work-nonwork enhancement decreased sleep disturbances. From one time point to the other, work-nonwork interference negatively related to sleep disturbances, and work-nonwork enhancement was mostly no longer (or positively) related to sleep disturbances. Over time sleep disturbances, in turn, predicted more interference and less enhancement between both life domains.

Conclusions

The results highlight that problematic work-nonwork interactions (i.e. high work-nonwork interference and low work-nonwork enhancement) disturb an individual's sleep in the short term (i.e. cross-sectional). Furthermore, the results suggest that individuals adapt to negative work-nonwork interactions over time, but that sleep disturbances impair an individual's work-nonwork interactions 2 years later.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 42, no 3, article id zsy255
Keywords [en]
work-nonwork interference, work-nonwork enhancement, sleep disturbance, longitudinal study, reverse directionality, lagged effects
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-169305DOI: 10.1093/sleep/zsy255ISI: 000467166400020PubMedID: 30561741OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-169305DiVA, id: diva2:1319576
Available from: 2019-06-03 Created: 2019-06-03 Last updated: 2019-06-03Bibliographically approved

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