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Amitriptyline at an Environmentally Relevant Concentration Alters the Profile of Metabolites Beyond Monoamines in Gilt-Head Bream
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), Spain.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8951-0466
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
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Number of Authors: 112019 (English)In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, ISSN 0730-7268, E-ISSN 1552-8618, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 965-977Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The antidepressant amitriptyline is a widely used selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that is found in the aquatic environment. The present study investigates alterations in the brain and the liver metabolome of gilt-head bream (Sparus aurata) after exposure at an environmentally relevant concentration (0.2 mu g/L) of amitriptyline for 7 d. Analysis of variance-simultaneous component analysis is used to identify metabolites that distinguish exposed from control animals. Overall, alterations in lipid metabolism suggest the occurrence of oxidative stress in both the brain and the liver-a common adverse effect of xenobiotics. However, alterations in the amino acid arginine are also observed. These are likely related to the nitric oxide system that is known to be associated with the mechanism of action of antidepressants. In addition, changes in asparagine and methionine levels in the brain and pantothenate, uric acid, and formylisoglutamine/N-formimino-L-glutamate levels in the liver could indicate variation of amino acid metabolism in both tissues; and the perturbation of glutamate in the liver implies that the energy metabolism is also affected. These results reveal that environmentally relevant concentrations of amitriptyline perturb a fraction of the metabolome that is not typically associated with antidepressant exposure in fish.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 38, no 5, p. 965-977
Keywords [en]
Aquatic toxicology, Pharmaceuticals, Multivariate statistics, Metabolomics, Antidepressant, Fish
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-169289DOI: 10.1002/etc.4381ISI: 000465607500005PubMedID: 30702171OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-169289DiVA, id: diva2:1320812
Available from: 2019-06-05 Created: 2019-06-05 Last updated: 2019-06-05Bibliographically approved

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Ziarrusta, HaizeaRibbenstedt, AntonBenskin, Jonathan P.
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