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Increase in stable isotope ratios driven by metabolic alterations in amphipods exposed to the beta-blocker propranolol
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
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Number of Authors: 72019 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 5, article id e0211304Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Anthropogenic pressures, such as contaminant exposure, may affect stable isotope ratios in biota. These changes are driven by alterations in the nutrient allocation and metabolic pathways induced by specific stressors. In a controlled microcosm study with the amphipod Gammarus spp., we studied effects of the beta-blocker propranolol on stable isotope signatures (delta N-15 and delta C-13), elemental composition (%C and %N), and growth (protein content and body size) as well as biomarkers of oxidative status (antioxidant capacity, ORAC; lipid peroxidation, TBARS) and neurological activity (acetylcholinesterase, AChE). Based on the known effects of propranolol exposure on cellular functions, i.e., its mode of action (MOA), we expected to observe a lower scope for growth, accompanied by a decrease in protein deposition, oxidative processes and AChE inhibition, with a resulting increase in the isotopic signatures. The observed responses in growth, biochemical and elemental variables supported most of these predictions. In particular, an increase in %N was observed in the propranolol exposures, whereas both protein allocation and body size declined. Moreover, both ORAC and TBARS levels decreased with increasing propranolol concentration, with the decrease being more pronounced for TBARS, which indicates the prevalence of the antioxidative processes. These changes resulted in a significant increase of the delta N-15 and delta C-13 values in the propranolol-exposed animals compared to the control. These findings suggest that MOA of beta-blockers may be used to predict sublethal effects in non-target species, including inhibited AChE activity, improved oxidative balance, and elevated stable isotope ratios. The latter also indicates that metabolism-driven responses to environmental contaminants can alter stable isotope signatures, which should be taken into account when interpreting trophic interactions in the food webs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 14, no 5, article id e0211304
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Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Physiology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-170043DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0211304ISI: 000468030100005PubMedID: 31095563OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-170043DiVA, id: diva2:1328992
Available from: 2019-06-24 Created: 2019-06-24 Last updated: 2019-06-24Bibliographically approved

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Eriksson Wiklund, Ann-KristinKumblad, LindaGorokhova, Elena
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