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Validation of Dried Blood Spots for Maternal Biomonitoring of Nonessential Elements in an Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining Area of Tanzania
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Number of Authors: 62019 (English)In: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, ISSN 0730-7268, E-ISSN 1552-8618, Vol. 38, no 6, p. 1285-1293Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biomonitoring studies of vulnerable populations in low- and middle-income countries are limited because traditional sampling methods are challenging to implement in low-resource settings. The present study examined the feasibility, precision, and accuracy of dried blood spots (DBS) for human biomonitoring of nonessential elements (cadmium [Cd], mercury [Hg], and lead [Pb]) in an area of northern Tanzania with artisanal and small-scale gold mining activities. Pregnant women (n = 44) were recruited in Geita during antenatal clinic visits, and DBS from capillary blood were collected on filter paper. As a gold-standard comparison, venous blood was sampled from the same participants and compared with the DBS. Venous blood, DBS, and quality control samples were analyzed for chemical elements by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Field blanks were very clean for most elements, generally only twice as high as corresponding laboratory filter blanks. No significant differences were found between duplicate DBS samples taken from the same participants, with near perfect intraclass correlation coefficients (0.99) for Cd, Hg, and Pb, indicating excellent reliability. Moreover, correlation was strong (r(2) > 0.9) and significant (p < 0.0001) between DBS and the quantitative venous blood, with regression line slopes close to 1.0 (0.847, 0.976, and 0.969 for Cd, Hg, and Pb, respectively), indicating high accuracy of the DBS method compared with the gold-standard approach. The DBS method is minimally invasive and was a feasible, precise, and accurate means of measuring exposure to Cd, Hg, and Pb in pregnant women in a low-resource setting. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 38, no 6, p. 1285-1293
Keywords [en]
Biomonitoring, Dried blood spots, Environmental exposure, Nonessential elements, Maternal, Accuracy
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-170111DOI: 10.1002/etc.4420ISI: 000469271300013PubMedID: 30900767OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-170111DiVA, id: diva2:1334372
Available from: 2019-07-02 Created: 2019-07-02 Last updated: 2019-07-02Bibliographically approved

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Nyanza, Elias C.Dewey, DeborahMartin, Jonathan W.
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Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab)Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry
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Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Earth and Related Environmental SciencesOccupational Health and Environmental Health

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