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Staying in or switching between permanent, temporary and self-employment during 2008-2010: Associations with changing job characteristics and emotional exhaustion
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
Number of Authors: 32019 (English)In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 215-237Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Labour market segmentation theories suggest that permanent and temporary workers are exposed to economic risks to different degrees, and differ in their working life quality and well-being. However, few studies have tested these ideas during times of economic crisis. Also, little is known about how the self-employed compare to permanent and temporary workers and are affected by economic downturns. This study investigated Swedish workers in different labour market segments before and after the financial crisis (2008 and 2010). More specifically, it looked at job characteristics and strain differences between permanent, temporary and self-employed workers. Data (N = 6335) came from SLOSH, a longitudinal representative cohort study of the Swedish workforce. Contradicting segmentation theories, differences between permanent and temporary workers were small. The self-employed stood out with favourable job characteristics, but comparable strain levels. During the crisis, work demands and strain declined for many of the workers studied here.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 40, no 2, p. 215-237
Keywords [en]
changing employment status, changing job characteristics, economic crisis, emotional exhaustion, self-employment, temporary work
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-170210DOI: 10.1177/0143831X18804648ISI: 000468942000004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-170210DiVA, id: diva2:1337622
Note

This research was supported by the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (FORTE grant no. 2004-2021, 2005-0734, 2009-1077, 2012-0979), by the Swedish Research Council (VR, grant no. 2009-6192, 2013-1645), and by FORTE funding for the Stockholm Stress Centre, a centre of excellence.

Available from: 2019-07-16 Created: 2019-07-16 Last updated: 2019-08-05Bibliographically approved

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Bernhard-Oettel, ClaudiaLeineweber, ConstanzeWesterlund, Hugo
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