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Plastic changes in brain morphology in relation to learning and environmental enrichment in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata)
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2233-9262
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.
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Number of Authors: 52019 (English)In: Journal of Experimental Biology, ISSN 0022-0949, E-ISSN 1477-9145, Vol. 222, no 10, article id UNSP jeb200402Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite the common assumption that the brain is malleable to surrounding conditions mainly during ontogeny, plastic neural changes can occur also in adulthood. One of the driving forces responsible for alterations in brain morphology is increasing environmental complexity that may demand enhanced cognitive abilities (e.g. attention, memory and learning). However, studies looking at the relationship between brain morphology and learning are scarce. Here, we tested the effects of both learning and environmental enrichment on neural plasticity in guppies (Poecilia reticulata), by means of either a reversal-learning test or a spatial-learning test. Given considerable evidence supporting environmentally induced plastic alterations, two separate control groups that were not subjected to any cognitive test were included to account for potential changes induced by the experimental setup alone. We did not find any effect of learning on any of our brain measurements. However, we found strong evidence for an environmental effect, where fish given access to the spatial-learning environment had larger relative brain size and optic tectum size in relation to those exposed to the reversal-learning environment. Our results demonstrate the plasticity of the adult brain to respond adaptively mainly to environmental conditions, providing support for the environmental enhancement theory.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 222, no 10, article id UNSP jeb200402
Keywords [en]
Brain plasticity, Cognition, Reversal learning, Spatial learning
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-170206DOI: 10.1242/jeb.200402ISI: 000469868900011PubMedID: 31053644OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-170206DiVA, id: diva2:1337631
Available from: 2019-07-16 Created: 2019-07-16 Last updated: 2019-07-16Bibliographically approved

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Fong, StephanieBuechel, Séverine D.Boussard, AnnikaKotrschal, AlexanderKolm, Niclas
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