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Reduction in sleep disturbances at retirement: evidence from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3243-0262
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
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2019 (English)In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Although retirement involves a radical change in daily activities, income, social roles and relationships, and the transition from paid work into retirement can, therefore, be expected to affect sleep, little is known about the effects of old-age retirement on changes in sleep disturbances, and how the impact of retirement may vary by gender, age and prior working conditions. This study modelled reported sleep disturbances up to nine years before to nine years following retirement in a sample of 2,110 participants from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH). Sleep disturbances over the retirement transition were modelled using repeated-measures regression analysis with Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE) in relation to gender, age at retirement, working patterns (night work, full-time/part-time work), control over work hours, and psychological and physical working conditions. The analyses controlled for civil status, education level, income obtained from registers and self-rated health. Retiring from paid work was associated with decreased sleep disturbances. Greater reductions in sleep disturbances were reported by women, as well as by participants who retired before age 65 years, who were working full-time, who lacked control over their work hours and who had high psychological demands. These results, suggesting that old-age retirement from paid work is associated with reductions in disturbed sleep, pose a challenge for governments seeking to increase retirement ages.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
Keywords [en]
work-time control, gender, retirement, sleep disturbances, psychological work demands, physical work demands
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-170739DOI: 10.1017/S0144686X19000515OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-170739DiVA, id: diva2:1337890
Available from: 2019-07-18 Created: 2019-07-18 Last updated: 2019-07-19

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van de Straat, VeraPlatts, Loretta G.Westerlund, Hugo
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  • apa
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