Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The Intergenerational Transmission of Early Childbearing: Examining Direct and Indirect Associations in a Swedish Birth Cohort
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
Number of Authors: 22019 (English)In: Behavioral Sciences, ISSN 2076-328X, Vol. 9, no 5, article id 54Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. Research shows that early childbearing is associated negatively with educational attainment and socioeconomic status (SES). Children born to young versus older mothers often do less well in school, and many have early first births. Some studies suggest that mothers' early childbearing operates through SES to influence the daughters' early childbearing, and some argue that the association is strong net of SES. The current study tests these direct and indirect associations. Methods. We estimate the pathways through which mothers' early childbearing influences daughters' early childbearing in several steps. First, we examine bivariate associations between mothers' early childbearing and SES, followed by bivariate associations between mothers' SES outcomes and their daughters' early childbearing. We then estimate the average marginal effects (AMEs) of mothers' early children on daughters', and a KHB decomposition to examine direct and indirect associations. Results. Findings suggest both direct and indirect associations. Nested models show that, net of a range of SES characteristics, mothers' early childbearing increases the probability of daughters' by approximately 8%; and KHB results suggest 37% mediation, with daughters' school performance (12%) and household educational attainment (10%) contributing the highest shares. Conclusion. Mothers' early childbearing and subsequent SES collectively influence the long-term wellbeing of children. Thus, early childbearing has consequences both within and across generations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 9, no 5, article id 54
Keywords [en]
intergenerational transmission, early childbearing, socioeconomic status, education
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-170805DOI: 10.3390/bs9050054ISI: 000471020100009PubMedID: 31100838OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-170805DiVA, id: diva2:1338355
Available from: 2019-07-22 Created: 2019-07-22 Last updated: 2019-07-22Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Högnäs, Robin S.Grotta, Alessandra
By organisation
Department of Public Health Sciences
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 9 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf