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Gamma Radiation Induced Changes in the Biochemical Composition of Aquatic Primary Producers and Their Effect on Grazers
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
Number of Authors: 22019 (English)In: Frontiers in environmental science, ISSN 2296-665X, Vol. 7, article id 100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Changes in the biochemical composition of primary producers can after their food quality, influencing their consumers and further propagating through the food web. Gamma (gamma) radiation is an environmentally important type of ionizing radiation as it can damage macromolecules such as DNA, proteins, and lipids due to its high frequency, short wavelength, and high energy photons. Here, we investigate whether short-term gamma-radiation changes the biochemical composition of primary producers and if radiation-induced changes affect higher trophic levels. Two phytoplankton species were exposed to two doses of gamma-radiation and compared to a control. The metabolic profile and total protein content of the algae were measured at five time points within 24 h. Additionally, we measured carbon incorporation rates of Daphnia magna fed with the exposed algae. Gamma radiation had a significant effect on phytoplankton biochemical composition, although these effects were species-specific. The changes in phytoplankton biochemical composition indicate that gamma-radiation induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). D. magna incorporated more carbon when fed with algae previously exposed to gamma-radiation; this could be due to radiation-induced changes in nutritional quality, algal anti-grazing defenses, or chemical feeding stimuli.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 7, article id 100
Keywords [en]
untargeted metabolite profiling, effects of ionizing radiation, phytoplankton, food quality, biochemical changes
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-170784DOI: 10.3389/fenvs.2019.00100ISI: 000473505300001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-170784DiVA, id: diva2:1338370
Available from: 2019-07-22 Created: 2019-07-22 Last updated: 2019-07-22Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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