Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
A Tale of Two Skates: Comparative Phylogeography of North American Skate Species with Implications for Conservation
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Harvard University, Massachusetts.
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 52019 (English)In: Copeia, ISSN 0045-8511, E-ISSN 1938-5110, Vol. 107, no 2, p. 297-304Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Genomic data can provide novel insights into the natural history of oceanic species. These data can inform the management of vulnerable and slow-maturing species by estimating population structure, rates of migration, and the distribution of genetic diversity. In this study we focus on two protected elasmobranch species, the Winter Skate, Leucoraja ocellata, and the Little Skate, L. erinacea. We use genome-wide SNPs to estimate population structure, and quantify migration and genetic diversity among both species from four sampling localities across the Atlantic coast of North America. We find that species of Leucoraja are generally isolated by distance, although we infer some fine-scale population structure. Specifically, estimates of effective migration infer fine-scale population structure in L. ocellata between the northern sites of Georges Bank and the Mid-Atlantic sampling sites, whereas L. erinacea shows no evidence of population genetic structure in any analyses. We also found that genetic diversity is concentrated in the central sites of Georges Bank and the Mid-Atlantic Bight for L. ocellata, but is reduced at these two sites in L. erinacea, suggesting opposite distributions of genetic diversity between species. Thus, genomic data suggest that while species of Leucoraja lack discrete population structure, they likely employ only mid-range dispersal. These findings correspond to ecological studies that have found eco physiological differences between embryonic and juvenile Leucoraja from different localities. Taken together, small-bodied skate research emphasizes the importance of local adaptive plasticity for marine species, even without population genetic structure. Conservation strategies should focus on managing the portions of the Atlantic coast considered most vital to reproduction of Leucoraja, but should not recognize multiple populations across their range.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 107, no 2, p. 297-304
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-170879DOI: 10.1643/CG-18-114ISI: 000472818500011OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-170879DiVA, id: diva2:1338536
Available from: 2019-07-23 Created: 2019-07-23 Last updated: 2019-07-23Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Di Santo, Valentina
By organisation
Department of Zoology
In the same journal
Copeia
Zoology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 2 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf