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Economic students’ beliefs of scientific knowledge and norms for action regarding climate change
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6350-7763
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8649-4632
2019 (English)In: NOFA7 Abstracts, Stockholm University, 2019, p. 98-98Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This study focuses on epistemic beliefs in relation to actions to mitigate climate change, and we investigate students’ beliefs and their support for societal actions and personal norms that direct individuals’ pro-environmental behaviour. Students’ conceptions of science - epistemic beliefs - concerns the way they regard scientific knowledge as fixed and certain, or evolving and uncertain. The study used a pen and pencil measurement distributed to the same students at two occasions, the first year’s (T1) measurement included 212 students in business and economics education, aged 17, and this was repeated a year later, in their final year. Changes are analysed through paired sample t-test, and partial correlation analyses were used to explore relations. Results show a weak and positive relation between the belief in certainty of knowledge and a norm of supporting taxes for solving climate change. At T2, a weak and negative relation was shown between recognising ‘science as having one clear-cut answer’ and ascribing solutions to climate change to both business and government. The results could suggest that a view of science as certain can influence the willingness to pay and contribute to solutions, and not ascribing government a responsibility. This however seems contradictory, as government are the initiators of policies such as CO2 taxes. Further research is needed to explain how epistemic beliefs can impact on norms for actions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm University, 2019. p. 98-98
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-171449OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-171449DiVA, id: diva2:1341313
Conference
NOFA7, Nordic Conference on Teaching and Learning in Curriculum Subjects, Stockholm, Sweden, May 13-15, 2019
Available from: 2019-08-08 Created: 2019-08-08 Last updated: 2019-08-30Bibliographically approved

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Ignell, CarolineDavies, PeterLundholm, Cecilia
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CiteExportLink to record
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