Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Lång-Kalles och Edvins sånger: Muntligt traderad och medialiserad proletär musikkultur från skillingtryck och 78-varvsskiva till rullband och digitaliserat ljud
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4367-856X
2019 (Swedish)In: Puls Musik- och dansetnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 2002-2972, Vol. 4, p. 47-79Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lång-Kalle’s and Edvin’s Songs: Orally Transmitted and Mediatised Proletarian Music Culture from Chapbooks and 78’s to Tape and Digitised Sound

In this article, etic-emic problems in the study of early 20th century Swedish working class culture are examined through the analysis of two Swedish and Norwegian proletarian songs; the navvy song “Järnvägsvisa”, from the Ofoten railway project in northern Norway in 1898–1903, and the strike song “Hamnarbetarnes Strejkmarsch”, from 1907. The songs are studied as orally transmitted and mediated tradition as well as technologically mediatised cultural artefacts. My perspective in this study is double: the songs represent working class history and the early labour movement in Sweden, but they are also a part of my own family history. The song tradition stems from Karl-Wilhelm “Lång-Kalle” Larsson, who was a navvy in Norway in 1902. Lång-Kalle learned the “Järnvägsvisa” song there, maybe from the songwriter Edvard Unger, and eventually taught his daughter Ragnhild the song, which later was recorded on reel-to-reel tape recorder in a family environment in 1970. Lång-Kalle and his brother Edvin Larsson were both well-known dockers in the Örebro port in the early 20th century. In that context the Larsson brothers were key individuals in organising the first dockers’ trade union in the town, and the strike song, “Hamnarbetarnes Strejkmarsch”, is probably connected to a conflict with English blacklegs. The “Järnvägsvisa” song was digitised from tape in 2017, and “Hamnarbetarnes Strejkmarsch” was reinterpreted as a song in 2018.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 4, p. 47-79
Keywords [en]
Reel-to-reel Tape Recorder, Proletarian, Working Class Music, Dockers, Navvies, Strike Song, Navvy Song, Mediatisation, Oral Tradition.
Keywords [sv]
Rullbandspelare, proletär, arbetarklassens musik, hamnarbetare, rallare, strejkvisor, rallarvisor, medialisering, muntlig tradition
National Category
Musicology
Research subject
Musicology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-172303OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-172303DiVA, id: diva2:1345978
Projects
Vardagens apparatur: Musikens medialisering, disciplinering och lokalisering i Sverige 1900–1970
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilAvailable from: 2019-08-26 Created: 2019-08-26 Last updated: 2019-08-27Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Free full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Burlin, Toivo
By organisation
Department of Culture and Aesthetics
Musicology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 8 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf