Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Effects of an Explosive Polar Cyclone Crossing the Antarctic Marginal Ice Zone
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 152019 (English)In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 46, no 11, p. 5948-5958Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Antarctic sea ice shows a large degree of regional variability, which is partly driven by severe weather events. Here we bring a new perspective on synoptic sea ice changes by presenting the first in situ observations of an explosive extratropical cyclone crossing the winter Antarctic marginal ice zone (MIZ) in the South Atlantic. This is complemented by the analysis of subsequent cyclones and highlights the rapid variations that ice-landing cyclones cause on sea ice: Midlatitude warm oceanic air is advected onto the ice, and storm waves generated close to the ice edge contribute to the maintenance of an unconsolidated surface through which waves propagate far into the ice. MIZ features may thus extend further poleward in the Southern Ocean than currently estimated. A concentration-based MIZ definition is inadequate, since it fails to describe a sea ice configuration which is deeply rearranged by synoptic weather. Plain Language Summary The extent of Antarctic sea ice is characterized by large regional variations that are in stark contrast with the alarming decreasing trends found in the Arctic. This is partly due to the presence of severe weather events, like extratropical cyclones travelling through the Southern Ocean and reaching the marginal ice zone (MIZ). The MIZ is a region where the ocean, atmosphere, and sea ice processes are closely interlinked. We provide direct evidence of how winter polar cyclones rearrange the MIZ and how their effects extend into the ice-covered region as far as the Antarctic continent. We present the first observations of large ice drift, ice concentration, and temperature changes as an explosively deepening cyclone crosses the MIZ. This case study is complemented by analysis of subsequent but more frequent storms that confirms how storminess in the Southern Ocean maintains a sea ice surface that is less compact, more mobile, and more extended than previously anticipated. Our results urge the scientific community to revise the current definition of the MIZ and improve its representation in models to better include the role of polar cyclones in detecting Antarctic sea ice trends.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 46, no 11, p. 5948-5958
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-172035DOI: 10.1029/2019GL082457ISI: 000477616200035OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-172035DiVA, id: diva2:1346205
Available from: 2019-08-27 Created: 2019-08-27 Last updated: 2019-08-27Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Messori, Gabriele
By organisation
Department of Meteorology
In the same journal
Geophysical Research Letters
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 3 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf