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Influence of chemical kinetics on spontaneous waves and detonation initiation in highly reactive and low reactive mixtures
Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita).
Number of Authors: 42019 (English)In: Combustion theory and modelling, ISSN 1364-7830, E-ISSN 1741-3559, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 467-495Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding the mechanisms of explosions is important for minimising devastating hazards. Due to the complexity of real chemistry, a single-step reaction mechanism is usually used for theoretical and numerical studies. The purpose of this study is to look more deeply into the influence of chemistry on detonation initiated by a spontaneous wave. The results of high-resolution simulations performed for one-step models are compared with simulations for detailed chemical models for highly reactive and low reactive mixtures. The calculated induction times for H-2/air and for CH4/air are validated against experimental measurements for a wide range of temperatures and pressures. It is found that the requirements in terms of temperature and size of the hot spots, which can produce a spontaneous wave capable to initiate detonation, are quantitatively and qualitatively different for one-step models compared to detailed chemical models. The time and locations when the exothermic reaction affects the coupling between the pressure wave and spontaneous wave are considerably different for a one-step and detailed models. The temperature gradients capable to produce detonation and the corresponding size of hot spots are much shallower and, correspondingly, larger than those predicted using one-step models. The impact of the detailed chemical model is particularly pronounced for the methane-air mixture. In this case, not only the hot spot size is much greater than that predicted by a one-step model, but even at the elevated pressure, the initiation of detonation by a temperature gradient is possible only if the temperature outside the gradient is rather high, so that can ignite a thermal explosion. The obtained results suggest that the one-step models do not reproduce correctly the transient and ignition processes, so that interpretation of the simulations performed using a one-step model for understanding mechanisms of flame acceleration, DDT and the origin of explosions must be considered with great caution.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 23, no 3, p. 467-495
Keywords [en]
Temperature gradient, chemical models, deflagration, detonation, explosions, ignition
National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Energy Engineering Atom and Molecular Physics and Optics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-171722DOI: 10.1080/13647830.2018.1551578ISI: 000475935500004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-171722DiVA, id: diva2:1350420
Available from: 2019-09-11 Created: 2019-09-11 Last updated: 2019-09-11Bibliographically approved

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