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Visual imagery during real-time fMRI neurofeedback from occipital and superior parietal cortex
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics. University of Trento, Italy.
Number of Authors: 32019 (English)In: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 200, p. 332-343Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Visual imagery has been suggested to recruit occipital cortex via feedback projections from fronto-parietal regions, suggesting that these feedback projections might be exploited to boost recruitment of occipital cortex by means of real-time neurofeedback. To WA this prediction, we instructed a group of healthy participants to perform peripheral visual imagery while they received real-time auditory feedback based on the BOLD signal from either early visual cortex or the medial superior parietal lobe. We examined the amplitude and temporal aspects of the BOLD response in the two regions. Moreover, we compared the impact of self-rated mental focus and vividness of visual imagery on the BOLD responses in these two areas. We found that both early visual cortex and the medial superior parietal cortex are susceptible to auditory neurofeedback within a single feedback session per region. However, the signal in parietal cortex was sustained for a longer time compared to the signal in occipital cortex. Moreover, the BOLD signal in the medial superior parietal lobe was more affected by focus and vividness of the visual imagery than early visual cortex. Our results thus demonstrate that (a) participants can learn to self-regulate the BOLD signal in early visual and parietal cortex within a single session, (b) that different nodes in the visual imagery network respond differently to neurofeedback, and that (c) responses in parietal, but not in occipital cortex are susceptible to self-rated vividness of mental imagery. Together, these results suggest that medial superior parietal cortex might be a suitable candidate to provide real-time feedback to patients suffering from visual field defects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 200, p. 332-343
Keywords [en]
Visual imagery, Real-time fMRI, Visual network, Medial superior parietal lobe, Self-regulation
National Category
Neurosciences Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-172949DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.06.057ISI: 000481579300028PubMedID: 31247298OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-172949DiVA, id: diva2:1352304
Available from: 2019-09-18 Created: 2019-09-18 Last updated: 2019-09-18Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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