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Late Pleistocene sediments, landforms and events in Scotland: a review of the terrestrial stratigraphic record
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
Number of Authors: 42019 (English)In: Earth and environmental science transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, ISSN 1755-6910, E-ISSN 1755-6929, Vol. 110, no 1-2, p. 39-91, article id PII S1755691018000890Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lithostratigraphical studies coupled with the development of new dating methods has led to significant progress in understanding the Late Pleistocene terrestrial record in Scotland. Systematic analysis and re-evaluation of key localities have provided new insights into the complexity of the event stratigraphy in some regions and the timing of Late Pleistocene environmental changes, but few additional critical sites have been described in the past 25 years. The terrestrial stratigraphic record remains important for understanding the timing, sequence and patterns of glaciation and deglaciation during the last glacial/interglacial cycle. Former interpretations of ice-free areas in peripheral areas during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) are inconsistent with current stratigraphic and dating evidence. Significant challenges remain to determine events and patterns of glaciation during the Early and Middle Devensian, particularly in the context of offshore evidence and ice sheet modelling that indicate significant build-up of ice throughout much of the period. The terrestrial evidence broadly supports recent reconstructions of a highly dynamic and climate-sensitive British-Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS), which apparently reached its greatest thickness in Scotland between 30 and 27ka, before the global LGM. A thick (relative to topography) integrated ice sheet reaching the shelf edge with a simple ice-divide structure was replaced after the LGM by a much thinner one comprising multiple dispersion centres and a more complex flow structure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 110, no 1-2, p. 39-91, article id PII S1755691018000890
Keywords [en]
chronostratigraphy, ice sheet, last glacial-interglacial cycle, lithostratigraphy
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-173064DOI: 10.1017/S1755691018000890ISI: 000482960300003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-173064DiVA, id: diva2:1352364
Available from: 2019-09-18 Created: 2019-09-18 Last updated: 2019-09-18Bibliographically approved

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