Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Creating Connections Between Researchers and Educators
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies. University of Oregon, USA.
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 152019 (English)In: Journal of Cognition and Development, ISSN 1524-8372, E-ISSN 1532-7647, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 110-133Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Translational research involving the development, implementation, and assessment of evidence-based interventions has shown promise in improving outcomes for children from lower socioeconomic-status backgrounds. One such approach involves 2-generation interventions, which target both children and their parents/caregivers. Here we traced the evolution of a 15-year partnership between researchers from the University of Oregon Brain Development Lab and educators from Head Start of Lane County, with a primary goal of developing, implementing, and evaluating a 2-generation intervention. The partnership has produced a successful 2-generation intervention, with current efforts focused on the development of a scaled-up delivery model that can be implemented by Head Start staff and integrated into existing Head Start structure classrooms. Taking a lessons-learned approach and including the perspectives of researchers and educators, we highlight 4 key themes that emerged from this partnership and may be useful to other researchers collaborating with educators to develop evidence-based interventions: 1) employ smaller-scale studies that trade ecological validity for experimental control to establish a proof of concept, 2) adapt to real-world constraints when scaling for broader implementation, 3) consider theoretical insights from smaller-scale studies when developing scalable delivery models, and 4) work together to find novel solutions to common problems. We close with results from a survey of teachers involved in the project, a broad reflection on successes of the collaboration, and a discussion on focusing efforts to sustain the intervention in the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 20, no 2, p. 110-133
National Category
Psychology Educational Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-173062DOI: 10.1080/15248372.2018.1515078ISI: 000481477700002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-173062DiVA, id: diva2:1353089
Available from: 2019-09-20 Created: 2019-09-20 Last updated: 2019-09-20Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Pakulak, Eric
By organisation
Department of Child and Youth Studies
In the same journal
Journal of Cognition and Development
PsychologyEducational Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 3 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf