Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Testing the rotational nature of the supermassive object M87*from the circularity and size of its first image
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). University of Michigan, USA.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7614-6677
Number of Authors: 42019 (English)In: Physical Review D: covering particles, fields, gravitation, and cosmology, ISSN 2470-0010, E-ISSN 2470-0029, Vol. 100, no 4, article id 044057Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) collaboration has recently released the first image of a black hole (BH), opening a new window onto tests of general relativity in the strong field regime. In this paper, we derive constraints on the nature of M87* (the supermassive object at the center of the galaxy M87), exploiting the fact that its shadow appears to be highly circular, and using measurements of its angular size. We first consider the simple case where M87* is assumed to be a Kerr BH. We find that the inferred circularity of M87* excludes Kerr BHs with observation angle theta(obs) greater than or similar to 45 degrees for dimensionless rotational parameter 0.95 less than or similar to a(*) <= 1 whereas the observation angle is unbounded for a(*) less than or similar to 0.9. We then consider the possibility that M87* might be a superspinar, i.e., an object described by the Kerr solution and spinning so fast that it violates the Kerr bound by having vertical bar a(*)vertical bar > 1. We find that, within certain regions of parameter space, the inferred circularity and size of the shadow of M87* do not exclude the possibility that this object might be a superspinar.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 100, no 4, article id 044057
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-173102DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevD.100.044057ISI: 000483047300008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-173102DiVA, id: diva2:1358375
Available from: 2019-10-07 Created: 2019-10-07 Last updated: 2019-10-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Freese, KatherineVagnozzi, SunnyVisinelli, Luca
By organisation
Department of PhysicsThe Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC)Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita)
In the same journal
Physical Review D: covering particles, fields, gravitation, and cosmology
Physical Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 45 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf