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Online stress management training: A randomized controlled pilot study of working women and men
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8213-1391
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
2019 (English)In: Abstract Book of the 19th European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology Congress: Working for the greater good - Inspiring people, designing jobs and leading organizations for a more inclusive society, 2019, p. 1343-1343, article id 1061Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Considering the costs of stress-related health problems, it seems valuable to develop easily accessible programs allowing individuals to develop their skills in how to think and act around daily life stressors. This study investigated 1) the feasibility of an online stress management training, and 2) its immediate effects on stress-related health outcomes.

Design/Methodology/Approach/Intervention: Working adults (N=138) were invited and then randomized to either of two conditions: an intervention group or a wait-list control group. The online stress management training included seven parts, each estimated to take a week and including sound-clips and film-clips along with exercises. Participants were asked to provide self-reports of stress and stress-related health complaints, before and after the intervention. The follow-up also included asking the intervention group about factors hindering and facilitating their participation.

Results: As for feasibility, the results suggest issues relating to adherence. This seemed associated with the timing of the study but also with user preferences regarding technological solutions. Regarding the effects, there were no statistically significant immediate effects for any of the outcome measures. However, there was a significant effect showed that perceived stress and stress-related health complaints decreased over time in both groups.

Limitations: Limitations involve the short-term follow-up and the focus on self-reports.

Research/Practical implications: Seasonal variations in occupational stress along the use of leisure time hinder participation. Thus, unguided stress management training should ideally be delivered during working hours.

Originality/Value: This is the first study investigating this online stress management training with no guidance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. p. 1343-1343, article id 1061
Keywords [en]
prevention, stress, online
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-174689OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-174689DiVA, id: diva2:1359171
Conference
19th European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology Congress, Turin, Italy, May 29-June 1, 2019
Available from: 2019-10-08 Created: 2019-10-08 Last updated: 2019-10-14Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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