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Transitions between work contexts among early career psychologist and social workers – a one year follow-up
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
2019 (English)In: Abstract Book of the 19th European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology Congress: Working for the greater good - Inspiring people, designing jobs and leading organizations for a more inclusive society, 2019, p. 606-607Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Our previous research on social workers and psychologists indicated that men were underrepresented in work contexts characterised by high job demands and low resources, and that work-related self-efficacy correlated positively with intention to leave. Moreover, the JD-R theory stipulates that work-contexts with well-balanced demands and resources facilitate job-crafting.

Purpose: We therefore aim to find out if those (women) who had a “bad” start in their profession, and low work-related self-efficacy, remain in “bad” work-contexts.

Approach: In 2018 we sent a survey to 5176 newly graduated psychologists and social workers in Sweden, of whom approximately 3800 previously received our 2017 survey. We will again use SLEIPNER 2.0 to conduct a hierarchal cluster analysis based on transition to work-life, perceived influence at work, and professional isolation, and compare the two cluster solutions – including mapping how participants migrate between the 2017 and 2018 clusters.

Preliminary results: In 2017 a satisfactory 8-cluster solution emerged where the two “best” and two “worst” clusters differed on most variables studied, however psychological demands hit the ceiling in all clusters. In the four middle clusters lack of one or two resources seemed to be compensated for by the other(s), as no further inter-cluster differences surfaced. In 2018 we expect most individuals to have transited between clusters of similar compositions.

Limitations: All results are based on self-reported survey data.

Practical implications and originality: This large scale longitudinal study will put focus on the context rather than the nature of the work of these professionals, opening up for fruitful interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. p. 606-607
Keywords [en]
work contexts, psychologists, social workers, job demands, women, men
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-174718OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-174718DiVA, id: diva2:1359271
Conference
19th European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology Congress, Turin, Italy, May 29-June 1, 2019
Available from: 2019-10-08 Created: 2019-10-08 Last updated: 2019-10-11Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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