Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Health and well-being among early career psychologists and social workers – compensatory resources in profiles of psychological work environments
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
2019 (English)In: Abstract Book of the 19th European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology Congress: Working for the greater good - Inspiring people, designing jobs and leading organizations for a more inclusive society, 2019, p. 1069-1069, article id 345Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Stress-related sick leave is more common among psychologists and social workers than the general working population in Sweden. The transition from higher education to work-life seems to interact with the work environment to influence long-term health.

Purpose: To explore how different profiles of psychosocial work environment variables relate to health and well-being among newly graduated social workers and psychologists.

Methods: Of the 5213 surveys distributed, 2091 responses are included in this study (1248 social workers and 843 psychologists; 1742women, 331 men and 14 unknown). The cluster variables were selected among the context related resources surveyed: Professional isolation, (social support and stress during) Transition to work-life and Influence at work.

Results: Of the eight context-related clusters, the two “best” clusters differed significantly from the two “worst” on almost every variable tested, including General Health and Life Satisfaction. The four clusters “in the middle” did not differ significantly from each other, except on the three cluster variables. As no differences were found in health and well-being, yet each of the “middle” clusters lacked in one or two of the cluster variables, indicates that some lacking resources can compensate for by the other(s). This finding is in line with the JD-R theory.

Limitations: These results are based on cross-sectional self-reported survey data.

Practical implications and originality: This large scale study puts focus on the context and the role of compensatory resources, opening up for fruitful health interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. p. 1069-1069, article id 345
Keywords [en]
stress, sick leave, psychologists, social workers, Sweden
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-174801OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-174801DiVA, id: diva2:1360007
Conference
19th European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology Congress, Turin, Italy, May 29-June 1, 2019
Available from: 2019-10-10 Created: 2019-10-10 Last updated: 2019-10-14Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Abstract book

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Pienaar, Jaco
By organisation
Work and organizational psychology
Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 22 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf