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How is low interpersonal justice related to organizational turnover over time? Results from a longitudinal cohort study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
2019 (English)In: Abstract Book of the 19th European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology Congress: Working for the greater good - Inspiring people, designing jobs and leading organizations for a more inclusive society, 2019, p. 1184-1184, article id 638Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aim of the current study is to investigate associations between justice perceptions and turnover behavior over time. We focus on interpersonal justice, which captures the respectful and dignified treatment from the supervisor, because it evokes strong emotional reactions. We relate interpersonal justice to two aspects of turnover (group, employer) over time.

Design: The project is based on data collected in the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) 2012-2016 (n=2450). We used autoregressive cross-lagged models within a multilevel structural equation modelling (MSEM) framework to address reciprocal influences on justice perceptions and turnover behavior.

Results: We found that high interpersonal justice at tn-1 was associated with a decreased risk of having left the employer at tn (B=-.037 p≤.001) and having changed the workgroup (B=-.067 p≤.001). Having changed the employer during the past two years was related to higher perceived interpersonal justice at tn (B=.220, p≤.001). Also, having changed the workgroup was related to increased interpersonal justice (B=.082, p≤.017).

Limitations: Causality cannot be proven despite the longitudinal design.

Practical Implications: Interpersonal justice is a potential target for interventions in order to keep employees in the organization.

Originality: We investigate cross-lagged associations between justice perceptions and two aspects of turnover behaviour taking four repeated measurements into account.

Conclusion: Poor interpersonal justice is a risk factor for leaving the group and organization.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. p. 1184-1184, article id 638
Keywords [en]
interpersonal justice, organizational turnover, longitudinal
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-174803OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-174803DiVA, id: diva2:1360024
Conference
19th European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology Congress, Turin, Italy, May 29-June 1, 2019
Available from: 2019-10-10 Created: 2019-10-10 Last updated: 2019-10-14Bibliographically approved

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