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To what extent do work contexts affect personal resources – a one-year follow up on work-related psychological flexibility
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
2019 (English)In: Abstract Book of the 19th European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology Congress: Working for the greater good - Inspiring people, designing jobs and leading organizations for a more inclusive society, 2019, p. 1527-1527, article id 1502Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Employees often need to adapt to situational demands as well as shift their mindset, preferably supported by a broad and adaptable work-related behavioral repertoire. Early in their careers psychologists and social workers are still developing said repertoire, which tests their work related psychological flexibility. Considered a personal resource, psychological flexibility moderates workrelated stress. However, prolonged lack of personal and organizational resources would impair the development of adequate behavioral repertoires, possibly to the extent of hampering work related psychological flexibility.

Purpose: We hypothesize that improved work-environment supports the development of relevant professional behavioral repertoires and strengthens work related psychological flexibility.

Approach: In 2018 (P2) we sent a survey to 5176 newly graduated psychologists and social workers in Sweden, of whom approximately 3800 previously received our 2017 (P1) survey. We will use the P1 and P2 ratings of psychosocial work environment to sort participants into No-, Positive- and Negative-change categories respectively. Thereafter we will measure intra-individual changes in work-related psychological flexibility per category, as well as inter-group differences in P1 to P2 change.

Preliminary results: In a cluster analysis on P1 data, results indicated that individuals in well-balanced work-environments rated their psychological flexibility higher than those in high-demands-low-resources contexts. Suspecting a direct or indirect influence of demands-resources (im)balance, we expect psychological flexibility at Point 2 to reflect changes in work-environment from Point 1 to Point 2.

Limitations: All results are based on self-reported survey data.

Practical implications and originality: Significant results would indicate that early career work-environment influences work-related psychological flexibility.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. p. 1527-1527, article id 1502
Keywords [en]
work contexts, personal resources, psychological flexibility
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-174808OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-174808DiVA, id: diva2:1360031
Conference
19th European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology Congress, Turin, Italy, May 29-June 1, 2019
Available from: 2019-10-10 Created: 2019-10-10 Last updated: 2019-10-14Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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