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Perception of gender equality statements: Explicit mention of non-binary gender identities as a strategy for creating a more inclusive organization image
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Personality, Social and Developmental Psychology.
2019 (English)In: Abstract Book of the 19th European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology Congress: Working for the greater good - Inspiring people, designing jobs and leading organizations for a more inclusive society, 2019, p. 1802-1802, article id 570Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Many organizations include gender equality policy statements in their information material. Our aim was to explore if different types of equality statements influence organization appeal and estimates of organization diversity.

Design: We tested three types of equality statements in a between-groups design (N = 424): (1) gender-balance (equality between women and men), (2) gender-blind (equality regardless of gender), (3) inclusive-gender (equality between women, men and individuals with a non-binary or other gender identity). Dependent variables were organization appeal, estimated organization equity and estimated diversity within the organization.

Results: For organization appeal and organization equity, no differences were found between conditions. General diversity within the organization was rated as significantly higher in the inclusive-gender condition compared to the gender-balance condition. No other between-group comparison was significant.

Limitations: Potential positive effects of an inclusive gender equality statement for individuals with a non-binary gender identity could not be assessed due to lack of participants.

Implications: Gender equality statements which explicitly include individuals of all gender identities (i.e., does not treat gender as a binary variable) seem to be received similarly to the other types of equality statements tested, with the exception of higher estimated diversity compared to a genderbalance statement. Results support the use of inclusive gender equality statements since they are inclusive of a larger number of individuals and do not differ from a gender-blind statement.

Originality: This is the first study investigating the impact of different types of gender equality statements which include gender identities other than women and men.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. p. 1802-1802, article id 570
Keywords [en]
gender equality, gender identities, organization appeal, organization diversity, organization equity
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-174813OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-174813DiVA, id: diva2:1360112
Conference
19th European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology Congress, Turin, Italy, May 29-June 1, 2019
Available from: 2019-10-11 Created: 2019-10-11 Last updated: 2019-10-14Bibliographically approved

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