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Anthropogenic fine aerosols dominate over the Pune region, Southwest India
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
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Number of Authors: 52019 (English)In: Meteorology and atmospheric physics (Print), ISSN 0177-7971, E-ISSN 1436-5065, Vol. 131, no 5, p. 1497-1508Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The major water-soluble ions, organic carbon (OC), elemental carbon (EC) and mass concentration of fine- (PM2.5) and coarse-mode (PM10-2.5) aerosols were measured at Pune during January-December 2016. The mass closure approach was used by comparing the sum of the masses of the individual chemical species to the gravimetric PM obtained by weighting the filter samples. The 1 year mean total mass concentration of fine and coarse mode was 40 mu gm(-3) (64%) and 23 mu g m(-3) (36%), respectively. The PM2.5/PM10 ratio was 0.64 +/- 0.9 indicating an abundance of fine-mode particles over Pune during the study period. A principal component analysis identified three components, where the one with highest explanatory power (59%) displayed clear impact of anthropogenic sources on the measured mass concentration of a majority of the compounds. The strong linear relationships between EC, OC, nss-SO42- and nss-K+ suggest a predominance of a common primary source, with a contribution from biofuel as well as biomass burning sources. Keeping the strong correlation and sources of individual chemical species as the base, it was noticed that (1) major contributors to fine- and coarse-mode particles over the Pune regions are carbonaceous aerosols and secondary inorganic aerosols (non-sea-salt SO42-, NO3-, and NH4+), (2) anthropogenic aerosols contribute mostly to the fine-mode, and (3) meteorological parameters play an important role in controlling levels of fine- and coarse-mode particles. Taken together, the study clearly indicates the dominance of anthropogenic sources during the entire year with more significance in the winter season.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 131, no 5, p. 1497-1508
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Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-174922DOI: 10.1007/s00703-018-0653-yISI: 000485049300024OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-174922DiVA, id: diva2:1360681
Available from: 2019-10-14 Created: 2019-10-14 Last updated: 2019-10-14Bibliographically approved

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Budhavant, Krishnakant
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