Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Hydrodynamic interactions and the diffusivity of spheroidal particles
Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita).
Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). Yale University, USA.
Number of Authors: 22019 (English)In: Journal of Chemical Physics, ISSN 0021-9606, E-ISSN 1089-7690, Vol. 151, no 2, article id 024107Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is intuitive that the diffusivity of an isolated particle differs from those in a monodisperse suspension, in which hydrodynamic interactions between the particles are operative. Batchelor [J. Fluid Mech. 74, 1-29 (1976) and J. Fluid Mech. 131, 155-175 (1983)] calculated how hydrodynamic interactions influenced the diffusivity of a dilute suspension of spherical particles, and Russel et al. [Colloidal Dispersions (Cambridge University Press, 1991)] and Brady [J. Fluid Mech. 272, 109-134 (1994)] treated nondilute (higher particle volume fraction) suspensions. Although most particles lack perfect sphericity, little is known about the effects of hydrodynamic interactions on the diffusivity of spheroidal particles, which are the simplest shapes that can be used to model anisotropic particles. Here, we calculate the effects of hydrodynamic interactions on the translational and rotational diffusivities of spheroidal particles of arbitrary aspect ratio in dilute monodisperse suspensions. We find that the translational and rotational diffusivities of prolate spheroids are more sensitive to eccentricity than for oblate spheroids. The origin of the hydrodynamic anisotropy is that found in the stresslet field for the induced-dipole interaction. However, in the dilute limit, the effects of anisotropy are at the level of a few percent. These effects have influence on a vast range of settings, from partially frozen colloidal suspensions to the dynamics of cytoplasm. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 151, no 2, article id 024107
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-174974DOI: 10.1063/1.5096764ISI: 000486055700009PubMedID: 31301717OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-174974DiVA, id: diva2:1362655
Available from: 2019-10-21 Created: 2019-10-21 Last updated: 2019-10-21Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Marath, Navaneeth K.Wettlaufer, John S.
By organisation
Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita)
In the same journal
Journal of Chemical Physics
Physical Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf