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Scaling the interactive effects of attractive and repellent odours for insect search behaviour
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0130-6485
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9190-6873
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6362-6199
2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 15309Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Insects searching for resources are exposed to a complexity of mixed odours, often involving both attractant and repellent substances. Understanding how insects respond to this complexity of cues is crucial for understanding consumer-resource interactions, but also to develop novel tools to control harmful pests. To advance our understanding of insect responses to combinations of attractive and repellent odours, we formulated three qualitative hypotheses; the response-ratio hypothesis, the repellent-threshold hypothesis and the odour-modulation hypothesis. The hypotheses were tested by exposing Drosophila melanogaster in a wind tunnel to combinations of vinegar as attractant and four known repellents; benzaldehyde, 1-octen-3-ol, geosmin and phenol. The responses to benzaldehyde, 1-octen-3-ol and geosmin provided support for the response-ratio hypothesis, which assumes that the behavioural response depends on the ratio between attractants and repellents. The response to phenol, rather supported the repellent-threshold hypothesis, where aversion only occurs above a threshold concentration of the repellent due to overshadowing of the attractant. We hypothesize that the different responses may be connected to the localization of receptors, as receptors detecting phenol are located on the maxillary palps whereas receptors detecting the other odorants are located on the antennae.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 9, article id 15309
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-175471DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-51834-1ISI: 000492825800019PubMedID: 31653955OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-175471DiVA, id: diva2:1366316
Available from: 2019-10-29 Created: 2019-10-29 Last updated: 2019-11-11Bibliographically approved

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Verschut, Thomas A.Carlsson, Mikael A.Hambäck, Peter A.
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