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Does neighbourhood green space quality affect noise annoyance? Contradictory results between self-reports and independent estimates of perceived qualities in a cross-sectional study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7139-2545
(English)In: Landscape and Urban Planning, ISSN 0169-2046, E-ISSN 1872-6062Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

Background: Research suggests access to green areas and visible greenery to mitigate traffic noise annoyance. Studies also suggest certain perceptual qualities of neighbourhood green spaces to improve wellbeing and physical activity. Here we test if the presence of these qualities in the neighbourhood might reduce annoyance from traffic noise at home. We control for potential single-source bias of the result by also employing independent estimates of these qualities retrieved from a separate study sample. Methods: We use cross-sectional public health survey data from 7,065 individuals including information about disturbances from road traffic noise and reports of perceived qualities in the neighbourhood green spaces. We also estimate the presence of these qualities by area-aggregating 28,016 individual perceptions collected from an independent survey sample into 3,598 different 1-km2 squares. Results: With self-reports, more reported qualities in neighbourhood green spaces indicate a mitigating effect on annoyance at given noise levels. With independent estimates however, results instead suggest that more qualities actually might increase sensitivity to traffic noise and that the inverse causality might explain the negative link observed between self-reported qualities and annoyance. Conclusions: A possible explanation could be that traffic noise stands out in more contrast in environments with high quality green spaces. Extra care might then be motivated to protect such areas from noise exposure. Self-reported and independently estimated perceived green space might yield different results in epidemiological studies due to single-source bias effects.

Keywords [en]
Noise annoyance, urban planning, landscape aesthetics, perceived sensory dimensions
National Category
Physical Geography
Research subject
Physical Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-175524OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-175524DiVA, id: diva2:1367462
Available from: 2019-11-04 Created: 2019-11-04 Last updated: 2019-11-29Bibliographically approved
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