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Judgment Capacity, Fear of Falling, and the Risk of Falls in Community-Dwelling Older Adults: The Progetto Veneto Anziani Longitudinal Study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). University of Padova, Italy.
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Number of Authors: 112019 (English)In: Rejuvenation Research, ISSN 1549-1684, E-ISSN 1557-8577Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Little is known of the factors that transform fear of falling (FOF) from a normal adaptive to a maladaptive response that could alter its impact on fall risk. Focusing on judgment capacity, we investigated whether it is associated with FOF and FOF-related activity restriction (AR), and whether it modifies the influence of FOF on fall risk. Data came from 2625 community-dwelling older adults enrolled in the Progetto Veneto Anziani. Baseline FOF and AR were assessed through personal interviews, and judgment capacity-high, moderate, or poor-through situational tests. At follow-up after 4.4 years, self-reported falls during the previous year were recorded. The associations between judgment and FOF/AR, and between FOF and the risk of at least one fall or recurrent falls (two or more falls), stratified by judgment capacity, were evaluated using multinomial logistic regressions. Compared with high-judgment participants, lower judgment participants were 20% more likely to report FOF; moderate judgment participants were 54% more likely and poor judgment participants twice as likely to report AR. After adjusting for potential confounders, including physical activity and physical performance, FOF increased the reporting of at least one fall only in the poor judgment group. The association between FOF and recurrent falls was stronger in individuals with poor (odds ratio [OR] = 3.66, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.10-6.36) than with moderate (OR = 2.81, 95% CI: 2.22-3.55) or high (OR = 1.65, 95% CI: 1.48-1.83) judgment. Poor judgment capacity increases the probability of FOF and AR in older adults, and may exacerbate the effect of FOF in increasing fall risk.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
Keywords [en]
fear of falling, judgment capacity, accidental falls, recurrent falls
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Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-175862DOI: 10.1089/rej.2019.2197ISI: 000489016200001PubMedID: 31418339OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-175862DiVA, id: diva2:1369256
Available from: 2019-11-11 Created: 2019-11-11 Last updated: 2019-11-11

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