Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The age-related blood pressure trajectories from young-old adults to centenarians: A cohort study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). University of Wisconsin, USA.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Catholic University of Rome, Italy.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Shandong University, China.
Number of Authors: 42019 (English)In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 296, p. 141-148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Blood pressure (BP) trajectories among older adults, especially among the oldest-old, are still poorly characterized. Objective: To investigate the longitudinal trajectories of four BP components with age and their potential influential factors. Methods: This population-based prospective cohort study included 3315 participants (age 60-105 years, 64.6% women) who were regularly examined from 2001 to 2004 through 2013-2016. The longitudinal trajectories of systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), pulse pressure (PP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) with age were estimated using linear mixed-effects models. Results: Overall, SBP and PP increased with age until similar to 80 years and then declined, whereas DBP and MAP decreased constantly after 60 years of age. The age-related BP trajectories varied by survival time, birth cohort, use of antihypertensive drugs, and heart disease. Specifically, people who survived < 2 years after the last visit showed higher levels of BP components before similar to 80 years, followed by steeper declines in SBP and PP. At the same age, people who were born earlier showed higher BP than those who were born later. People who used antihypertensive drugs had higher BP than those who did not until similar to 80-90 years old, thereafter BP showed no significant difference. After similar to 80 years old, people with heart disease showed steeper declines in SBP and PP than those without. Conclusions: The late-life longitudinal BP trajectories with age vary with demographics, clinical conditions, and contextual factors. These findings may help better understand the age-dependent relationship of BP with health outcomes as well as help achieve optimal BP control in older people. Perspectives: Competency in medical knowledge: Understanding the age-related blood pressure trajectories and potential influential factors may help improve blood pressure management in older people. Translational outlook 1: Blood pressure trajectories with age in older adults vary by birth cohort, survival time, antihypertensive therapy, and heart disease. The age-related blood pressure trajectories by birth cohorts are featured with lower blood pressure levels at the same age in more recent birth cohorts, which may partially reflect the improvement of blood pressure control over time. Translational outlook 2: The age-related blood pressure trajectories in the oldest old (e.g., age similar to 85 years) are characterized by steeper and faster blood pressure declines associated with heart disease and short survival (e.g., < 2 years). This may have implications for the optimal management of blood pressure as well as for the interpretation of the relationships between blood pressure and health outcomes (e.g., death) among the oldest old. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 296, p. 141-148
Keywords [en]
Blood pressure, Survival, Birth cohort effect, Antihypertensive therapy, Heart disease, Cohort study
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-175927DOI: 10.1016/j.ijcard.2019.08.011ISI: 000488960200032PubMedID: 31443986OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-175927DiVA, id: diva2:1371502
Available from: 2019-11-20 Created: 2019-11-20 Last updated: 2019-11-20Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed
By organisation
Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI)
In the same journal
International Journal of Cardiology
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf