Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Lobbying the Client: The role of policy intermediaries in corporate political activity
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
Number of Authors: 22019 (English)In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Traditionally, CPA scholarship has either assumed away policy intermediaries completely, or depicted them as corporate mouthpieces. Meanwhile, research on policy intermediaries has portrayed actors such as think tanks, PR firms and lobbying firms as far more active and self-interested. Our study investigates this puzzle by attending to the question: 'Whose political agenda is expressed by intermediaries during their lobbying on behalf of corporate clients?' By importing insights from studies of policy intermediaries, and approaching the world of lobbying qualitatively - delving deep into the 'how' and 'why' of corporate lobbying using ethnographic field data and interviews with corporate lobbyists - we provide a different, more fine-grained picture of the lobbyist-client relationship, in which policy intermediaries shape, adapt and even invent their clients' agendas. Our study contributes CPA scholarship by (1) providing an analytical distinction between the political agendas of corporate clients and those of their lobbyists, (2) bringing further detail and modification to Barley's theory of an institutional field of political influence and (3) identifying agency problems between client and lobbyist as a novel explanation for why the financial profitability of CPA investment has been difficult to verify. Moreover, the study brings further sophistication to a burgeoning literature on policy intermediaries by suggesting that lobbyists' own professional characteristics - such as length of political experience and strength of political convictions - influence how independently of their clients they dare to act.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
Keywords [en]
corporate lobbying, corporate political activity, institutional fields, policy intermediaries, public affairs consultants
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-175777DOI: 10.1177/0170840619866486ISI: 000491610100001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-175777DiVA, id: diva2:1372266
Available from: 2019-11-22 Created: 2019-11-22 Last updated: 2020-01-16

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Murray, Ohn
By organisation
Stockholm Business School
In the same journal
Organization Studies
Economics and Business

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 2 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf