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Macroevolutionary evidence suggests trait-dependent coevolution between behavior and life-history
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3705-1907
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9774-5935
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. University of British Columbia, Canada.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7366-1868
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Number of Authors: 72019 (English)In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 73, no 11, p. 2312-2323Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Species with fast life-histories typically prioritize current over future reproductive events, compared to species with slow life-histories. These species therefore require greater energetic input into reproduction, and also likely have less time to realize their reproductive potential. Hence, behaviors that increase access to both resources and mating opportunities, at a cost of increased mortality risk, could coevolve with the pace of life-history. However, whether this prediction holds across species, remains untested under standardized conditions. Here, we test how risky behaviors, which facilitate access to resources and mating opportunities (i.e., activity, boldness, and aggression), along with metabolic rate, coevolve with the pace of life-history across 20 species of killifish that present remarkable divergences in the pace of life-history. We found a positive association between the pace of life-history and aggression, but interestingly not with other behavioral traits or metabolic rate. Aggression is linked to interference competition, and in killifishes is often employed to secure mates, while activity and boldness are more relevant for exploiting energetic resources. Our results suggest that the trade-off between current and future reproduction plays a more prominent role in shaping mating behavior, while behaviors related to energy acquisition may be influenced by ecological factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 73, no 11, p. 2312-2323
Keywords [en]
Killifish, life-history trade-offs, pace-of-life syndrome (POLS) hypothesis, risk-taking behavior, standard metabolic rate (SMR)
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-175770DOI: 10.1111/evo.13845ISI: 000491091500001PubMedID: 31579930OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-175770DiVA, id: diva2:1372522
Available from: 2019-11-25 Created: 2019-11-25 Last updated: 2019-12-17Bibliographically approved

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Eckerström-Liedholm, SimonSowersby, WillMorozov, Sergeyvan der Bijl, WouterRowiński, Piotr K.Gonzalez-Voyer, AlejandroRogell, Björn
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