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Household Food Insecurity Is Associated with Higher Adiposity among US Schoolchildren Ages 10-15 Years: The Healthy Communities Study
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Number of Authors: 82019 (English)In: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 149, no 9, p. 1642-1650Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Limited research exists on the relationship between food insecurity and children's adiposity and diet and how it varies by demographic characteristics in the United States. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between household food insecurity and child adiposityrelated outcomes, measured as BMI (kg/m(2)) z score (BMI-z), weight status, andwaist circumference, and diet outcomes, and examined if the associations differ by age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Methods: Data collected in 2013-2015 from 5138 US schoolchildren ages 4-15 y from 130 communities in the cross-sectional Healthy Communities Study were analyzed. Household food insecurity was self-reported using a validated 2-item screener. Dietary intake was assessed using the 26-item National Cancer Institute's Dietary Screener Questionnaire, and dietary behaviors were assessed using a household survey. Data were analyzed using multilevel statistical models, including tests for interaction by age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Results: Children from food-insecure households had higher BMI-z (beta: 0.14; 95% CI: 0.06, 0.21), waist circumference (beta: 0.91 cm; 95% CI: 0.18, 1.63), odds of being overweight or obese (OR: 1.17; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.34), consumed more sugar from sugar-sweetened beverages (beta : 1.44 g/d; 95% CI: 0.35, 2.54), and less frequently ate breakfast (beta: -0.28 d/wk; 95% CI: -0.39, -0.17) and dinner with family (beta(:) -0.22 d/wk; 95% CI: -0.37, -0.06) compared to children from food-secure households. When examined by age groups (4-9 and 10-15 y), significant relationships were observed only for older children. There were no significant interactions by sex or race/ethnicity. Conclusions: Household food insecurity was associated with higher child adiposity-related outcomes and several nutrition behaviors, particularly among older children, 10-15 y old.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 149, no 9, p. 1642-1650
Keywords [en]
children, food insecurity, adiposity, obesity, dietary intake, dietary behaviors
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-175882DOI: 10.1093/jn/nxz108ISI: 000488554700018PubMedID: 31174211OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-175882DiVA, id: diva2:1374539
Available from: 2019-12-02 Created: 2019-12-02 Last updated: 2019-12-02Bibliographically approved

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Nhan, Lilly A.Plank, Kaela R.Gurzo, Klara
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