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Do personal resources matter beyond job demands and job resources? Main and interaction effects on health-related outcomes among women working within the welfare sector
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8213-1391
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Work and organizational psychology. North-West University, South Africa.
2019 (English)In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 64, no 3, p. 515-529Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Overall, health-related correlates of job demands and job resources are well-known. However, in today’s working life, personal resources are considered to be of increasing importance. Beyond general mental ability, knowledge regarding personal resources remains limited. This is particularly so among women working in the welfare sector, a sector mainly employing women and with the work typically involving clients.

Objective: This study investigated the importance of job demands, job resources, and personal resources for health-related outcomes, as well as the mitigating effects of resources, among women working within the Swedish welfare sector.

Methods: Self-reports from 372 women employed within the welfare sector were analyzed using hierarchical multiple regression.

Results: Overall, increasing job demands were associated with poorer health outcomes while increasing job resources and personal resources were associated with better health. Additionally, lower control aggravated the effects of quantitative job demands on health outcomes while lower feedback mitigated the effect of qualitative demands. However, personal resources had no moderating effect.

Conclusions: Job resources seem more pertinent to health than personal resources, at least among women working within the welfare sector in Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 64, no 3, p. 515-529
Keywords [en]
occupational health psychology, work climate, signaling, limit-setting
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-176369DOI: 10.3233/WOR-193013ISI: 000498815300012OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-176369DiVA, id: diva2:1374963
Note

The study makes use of data from the project, The manager, the mission and the work environment: Interventions for improving workplaces and organizations, which was supported by a grant from AFA Insurance (Ref. No. 090325) to Prof. Magnus Sverke. Thanks to all who volunteered participation and to those who helped with the study. This research was carried out within the Stockholm Stress Center, a center of excellence supported by funding from the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (FORTE; Ref. No. 2009-1758).

Available from: 2019-12-03 Created: 2019-12-03 Last updated: 2019-12-09Bibliographically approved

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