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A randomized controlled pilot study of the effects of 6-week high intensity hatha yoga protocol on health-related outcomes among students
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Bodywork & Movement Therapies, ISSN 1360-8592, E-ISSN 1532-9283, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 766-772Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Modern hatha yoga exercises (YE) provide an alternative form of physical activity which may reduce stress, facilitate recovery and improve health. This study investigated the short-term effects of high intensity hatha yoga exercises (HIY) on health-related outcomes.

Methods: A 6-week randomized controlled study was performed to compare HIY with a control group not changing their exercise behavior. Healthy students (N = 44; median age: 25 years, range 20–39 years; HIY: n = 21, including 3 men; control group: n = 23, including 3 men) novice to yoga participated in the intervention which included one weekly class and recommended home training. Participants provided self-reports in questionnaires before and after the intervention. Self-reports included anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), stress (Perceived Stress Scale), sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), insomnia (Insomnia Severity Index), subjective health complaints (Common Symptoms in General Practice Index) and self-rated health (single-item).

Results: After the 6-week intervention, there were no between-group differences in anxiety, depression, stress, sleep or self-rated health. However, when investigating associations within the HIY-group, a higher HIY-dose was related to less depression (r = 0.47; p = 0.03), improved sleep quality (r = 0.55; p = 0.01), and less insomnia (r = 0.49; p = 0.02).

Conclusions: There were no short-term between-group effects of HIY on mental distress, sleep or self-rated health. However, within the HIY-group, a higher dose was associated with improved mental health in terms of depression and with improved sleep. Although future studies with larger samples are needed, these preliminary findings suggest short-term positive effects of HIY on health-related outcomes among students.

Trial registration number NCT01305096.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 23, no 4, p. 766-772
Keywords [en]
anxiety, depression, sleep, stress, students
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-176372DOI: 10.1016/j.jbmt.2019.05.013ISI: 000496955100014OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-176372DiVA, id: diva2:1374980
Available from: 2019-12-03 Created: 2019-12-03 Last updated: 2019-12-09Bibliographically approved

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