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Reduced melatonin synthesis in pregnant night workers: Metabolic implications for offspring
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6980-2971
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Number of Authors: 62019 (English)In: Medical Hypotheses, ISSN 0306-9877, E-ISSN 1532-2777, Vol. 132, article id 109353Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Several novel animal studies have shown that intrauterine metabolic programming can be modified in the event of reduced melatonin synthesis during pregnancy, leading to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in the offspring. It is therefore postulated that female night workers when pregnant may expose the offspring to unwanted health threats. This may be explained by the fact that melatonin is essential for regulating energy metabolism and can influence reproductive activity. Moreover, the circadian misalignment caused by shift work affects fertility and the fetus, increasing the risk of miscarriage, premature birth and low birth weight, phenomena observed in night workers. Thus, we hypothesize that light-induced melatonin suppression as a result of night work may alter intrauterine metabolic programming in pregnant women, potentially leading to metabolic disorders in their offspring.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 132, article id 109353
Keywords [en]
Pregnancy, Offspring, Melatonin, Metabolism, Shift work
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-176588DOI: 10.1016/j.mehy.2019.109353ISI: 000496037800020PubMedID: 31421432OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-176588DiVA, id: diva2:1377230
Available from: 2019-12-11 Created: 2019-12-11 Last updated: 2019-12-12Bibliographically approved

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