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Association Between Insomnia And Mortality Is Only Evident Among Long Sleepers
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Number of Authors: 52019 (English)In: Nature and Science of Sleep, ISSN 1179-1608, Vol. 11, p. 333-342Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Previous studies investigating the relationship between insomnia and mortality have been inconsistent. Purpose: We aimed to assess whether nocturnal insomnia symptoms and non-restorative sleep are associated with all-cause mortality and whether they modify the associations between short and long sleep duration and all-cause mortality. Patients and methods: The present report is based on a prospective cohort study of 39,139 participants with a mean follow-up time of 19.6 years. Cox proportional hazard models with attained age as timescale were used to estimate overall mortality hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for different categories of sleep duration and insomnia symptoms. Results: Both difficulty initiating sleep and daytime sleepiness were independently associated with increased mortality among those with sleep duration of 9 hrs or more (HR 1.51, 95% CI 1.11-2.07 and HR 1.37, 95% CI 1.03-1.82). Mortality increased with increasing severity of difficulties initiating sleep (p for trend 0.04) and daytime sleepiness (p for trend 0.01) among the long sleepers. None of the insomnia symptoms were associated with mortality among those who reported sleep duration of 8 hrs or less. Conclusion: Long sleep in combination with difficulties initiating sleep and daytime sleepiness, possibly due to psychiatric or physical disorders, was thus associated with increased mortality, whereas long sleep without difficulties falling asleep or daytime sleepiness was not associated with mortality. Our study emphasizes the need to take nocturnal insomnia symptoms and daytime sleepiness into consideration when assessing the influence of sleep duration on mortality. Additional research is needed to elucidate the relationship between long sleep, insomnia and related psychiatric and physical disorders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 11, p. 333-342
Keywords [en]
prospective cohort study, sleep quality, sleep duration
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-176649DOI: 10.2147/NSS.S222049ISI: 000496525600001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-176649DiVA, id: diva2:1381586
Available from: 2019-12-23 Created: 2019-12-23 Last updated: 2019-12-23Bibliographically approved

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Åkerstedt, Torbjörn
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Stress Research Institute
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