Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Changes in Cognitive Impairment in the Czech Republic
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, USA.
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 62019 (English)In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 72, no 3, p. 693-701Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Studies from North America and Western Europe suggest stable or declining trends in impaired cognition across birth cohorts. Objective: We aimed to examine changes in the age-specific prevalence of cognitive impairment in the Czech Republic. Methods: The study used two samples from the population-based Czech Survey on Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe. Age-specific prevalence of cognitive impairment (defined based on scores in verbal fluency, immediate recall, delayed recall, and temporal orientation) was compared between participants in wave 2 (2006/2007; n = 1,107) and wave 6 (2015; n = 3,104). Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between the wave and cognitive impairment, step-wise adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Multiple sensitivity analyses, focusing on alternative operationalizations of relative cognitive impairment, impact of missing cognitive data, and survival bias, were carried out. Results: The most conservative estimate suggested that the age-specific prevalence of cognitive impairment declined by one fifth, from 11% in 2006/2007 to 9% in 2015. Decline was observed in all sensitivity analyses. The change was associated with differences in physical inactivity, management of high blood cholesterol, and increases in length education. Conclusion: Older adults in the Czech Republic, a country situated in the Central and Eastern European region, have achieved positive developments in cognitive aging. Longer education, better management of cardiovascular factors, and reduced physical inactivity seem to be of key importance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 72, no 3, p. 693-701
Keywords [en]
Alzheimer's disease, cognitive impairment, Czech Republic, epidemiology, prevalence, trends
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Geriatrics Neurology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-177827DOI: 10.3233/JAD-190688ISI: 000499720000004PubMedID: 31609688OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-177827DiVA, id: diva2:1383619
Available from: 2020-01-08 Created: 2020-01-08 Last updated: 2020-01-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed
By organisation
Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI)
In the same journal
Journal of Alzheimer's Disease
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and EpidemiologyGeriatricsNeurology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf