Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Frailty Syndromes in Persons With Cerebrovascular Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Italy.
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 92019 (English)In: Frontiers in Neurology, ISSN 1664-2295, E-ISSN 1664-2295, Vol. 10, article id 1255Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Frailty can change the prognosis and treatment approach of chronic diseases. Among others, frailty has been associated with cerebrovascular diseases such as stroke. However, the extent to which the two conditions are related is unclear, and no systematic review of the literature has been conducted. Objectives: To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis assessing the association of cerebrovascular diseases and frailty, as well as prefrailty, in observational studies. The project was carried out on behalf of the Joint Action ADVANTAGE WP4 group. Methods: The review was performed according to PRISMA guidelines. We searched PubMed, Web of Science, and Embase from 01/01/2002-26/05/2019. Pooled estimates were obtained through random effect models and Mantel-Haenszel weighting. Homogeneity was assessed with the I-2 statistic. Publication bias was assessed with Egger's and Begg's tests. Results: Of 1027 studies searched, 18 studies were included (n = 48,009 participants). Stroke was the only cerebrovascular disease studied in relation to frailty syndromes. All studies except one reported an association between stroke and prefrailty or frailty. However, most studies were not of high quality and there was heterogeneity between results. The pooled prevalence of prefrailty and frailty in stroke patients was 49% (95% CI = 42-57) and 22% (95% CI = 16-27), respectively. The prevalence of frailty was 2-fold in persons with stroke compared to those without stroke (pooled odds ratio = 2.32, 95% CI = 2.11-2.55). Only two studies longitudinally examined the association between stroke and frailty, producing conflicting results. Conclusions: Frailty and prefrailty are common in persons with stroke. These results may have clinical implications, as they identify the need to assess frailty in post-stroke survivors and assess how it may affect prognosis. Better quality, longitudinal research that examines the temporal relationship between stroke and frailty are needed, as well as studies on other types of cerebrovascular disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 10, article id 1255
Keywords [en]
frail, cerebrovascular disease, stroke, vulnerable, aging, prefrail, geriatric, chronic disease
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-177638DOI: 10.3389/fneur.2019.01255ISI: 000502720200001PubMedID: 31849819OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-177638DiVA, id: diva2:1384604
Available from: 2020-01-10 Created: 2020-01-10 Last updated: 2020-01-10Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed
By organisation
Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI)
In the same journal
Frontiers in Neurology
Geriatrics

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf