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Reciprocal relations between work stress and insomnia symptoms: A prospective study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3658-6448
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3243-0262
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
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Number of Authors: 62020 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 29, no 2, article id e12949Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Work stress and poor sleep are closely related in cross-sectional data, but evidence from prospective data is limited. We analysed how perceived stress and work stressors (work demands, decision authority and workplace social support) are related to key dimensions of insomnia over time, using structural equation modelling. Biennial measurements from a large sample of the working population in Sweden enabled us to analyse both the relationship from stress to sleep as well as that from sleep to stress. Overall, we found reciprocal relations between insomnia and all four stress measures. However, looking at the relation between each dimension of insomnia and each stress measure, there were some differences in direction of effects. In the direction from stress to sleep, all work stressors as well as perceived stress predicted both difficulties initiating sleep and difficulties maintaining sleep. The same was found for non-restorative sleep, with the exception for decision authority. In the opposite direction, difficulties maintaining sleep predicted increased levels of work demands and perceived stress. Difficulties initiating sleep stood out among the insomnia symptoms as not predicting any of the stress measures, while non-restorative sleep was the only symptom predicting all stress measures. The results advance the understanding of the stress-sleep relationship and indicate a potential vicious circle between insomnia and perceived stress as well as work stressors, suggesting that the workplace could be an arena for interventions to alleviate insomnia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2020. Vol. 29, no 2, article id e12949
Keywords [en]
job demands, longitudinal, nonrestorative sleep, occupational stress, psychological stress, sleep initiation and maintenance disorders
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-177589DOI: 10.1111/jsr.12949ISI: 000500238700001PubMedID: 31793085OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-177589DiVA, id: diva2:1385785
Available from: 2020-01-15 Created: 2020-01-15 Last updated: 2020-03-16Bibliographically approved

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Garefelt, JohannaPlatts, Loretta G.Hyde, MartinMagnusson Hanson, Linda L.Westerlund, HugoÅkerstedt, Torbjörn
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