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Doom, gloom, or boom?: Perceptions of climate change among Canadian winegrowers
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Brock University, Canada; The University of the Sunshine Coast, Australia.
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Wine Research, ISSN 1179-1403, Vol. 11, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Climate change (CC) could have both positive and negative consequences for the Canadian and global wine industries. Understanding how winegrowers perceive CC, however, can provide insight into how to better assist the industry to cope with the impacts of a changing climate. Material and methods: An online survey of 122 Canadian winegrowers was conducted to understand knowledge, beliefs, environmental values, and perceptions towards CC and its impact on the Canadian wine industry. Environmental values (New Environmental Paradigm score), subjective and objective CC knowledge, CC skepticism and uncertainty, belief in anthropogenic CC, and perceptions of the impacts of CC were measured using established tools. Results: Overall, results show that Canadian winegrowers have a relatively low level of CC skepticism, a medium level of CC scientific knowledge, a pro-ecological (as opposed to anthropological) worldview, and generally believe that CC is caused by a mix of anthropogenic and natural forces. Moreover, a majority of respondents (60%) believe that CC has both positive and negative con- sequences on their vineyard and winery operations, while 8% think that climate change has no consequence on their operations. An extended growing season for grapes, the improvement of grape and wine quality, and the possibility to grow varieties that are not currently viable were the main beneficial consequences of CC reported by participants, while an increase in both disease and pests in the vineyard were the most commonly identified disadvantages. Finally, no association was observed between CC skepticism, knowledge, environmental values, and the perception of CC consequences. Conclusion: Our findings inform communication strategies for the wine industry around CC, and provide important baseline information on winegrowers’ perceptions that inform wider efforts to improve the capacity of the industry to develop and adapt to the consequences of CC. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 11, p. 1-11
Keywords [en]
wine, grapes, sustainability, adaptation
National Category
Other Social Sciences Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-178208DOI: 10.2147/IJWR.S188787Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85067028930OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-178208DiVA, id: diva2:1387188
Available from: 2020-01-20 Created: 2020-01-20 Last updated: 2020-01-21Bibliographically approved

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