Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The Contribution of Alcohol Use, Other Lifestyle Factors and Working Conditions to Socioeconomic Differences in Sickness Absence
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6114-4436
Number of Authors: 42020 (English)In: European Addiction Research, ISSN 1022-6877, E-ISSN 1421-9891, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 40-51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: This study investigates how alcohol use contributes to the social gradient in sickness absence. Other factors assessed include lifestyle factors (smoking, physical activity and body mass index), physical and psychosocial working conditions. Methods: The study used baseline data from the Stockholm public health cohort 2006, with an analytical sample of 17,008 respondents aged 25-64 years. Outcome variables included self-reported short-term (<14 days) and register-based long-term (>14 days) sickness absence. Socioeconomic position (SEP) was measured by occupational class. Alcohol use was measured by average weekly volume and frequency of heavy episodic drinking. Negative binominal regression was used to estimate sex-specific SEP differences in sickness absence, before and after adjusting for alcohol use and the additional explanatory factors. Results: Adjusting for alcohol use attenuated the SEP differences in long-term sickness absence by 20% for men and 14% for women. Alcohol use explained a smaller proportion of the differences in short-term sickness absence. Alcohol use in combination with other lifestyle factors attenuated the SEP differences (20-35%) for both outcomes. Physical working conditions explained more than half of the gradient in long-term sickness absence, whereas psychosocial conditions had greater impact on short-term sickness absence among men. Discussion/Conclusion: Alcohol use explains a substantial proportion of the SEP disparities in long-term sickness absence among men. The effect is smaller among women and for short-term sickness absence. Our findings support the notion that physical working conditions constitute the key explanatory variable for SEP differences in long-term sickness absence, but add that psychosocial working conditions have greater impact on the gradient in short-term sickness absence among men.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2020. Vol. 26, no 1, p. 40-51
Keywords [en]
Sickness absence, Socioeconomic differences, Alcohol use, Lifestyle factors, Working conditions
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-178636DOI: 10.1159/000504437ISI: 000507613400005PubMedID: 31747671OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-178636DiVA, id: diva2:1396066
Available from: 2020-02-25 Created: 2020-02-25 Last updated: 2020-03-05Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Landberg, Jonas
By organisation
Department of Public Health Sciences
In the same journal
European Addiction Research
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf