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West Asian climate during the last millennium according to the EC-Earth model
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology . Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute, Sweden.
Number of Authors: 42020 (English)In: Canadian journal of earth sciences (Print), ISSN 0008-4077, E-ISSN 1480-3313, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 102-113Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

West Asia is one of the most vulnerable regions to ongoing climate change but has been poorly investigated. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the impact of anthropogenic greenhouse gas, natural forcing, and internal climate variability on temperature and rainfall in this region. In this study, we focus on the climate of West Asia during the last millennium by using a transient simulation of the global earth system model EC-Earth (v3.1). The model performs well in terms of present-day temperature and precipitation patterns and their regional averages. Time series of yearly-mean precipitation and temperature of West Asia show that precipitation increases until the start of the Little Ice Age (1450-1850 CE) and subsequently decreases, whereas temperature shows a cooling trend during the entire last millennium. We first discuss the model output data for climate trends during two periods, 850-1450 CE and 1450-1850 CE. In 850-1450 CE, the largest wetting trend occurred in the eastern regions to the north of the Persian Gulf because of a westward shift of the Indian precipitation core and more moisture transport from the Arabian Sea. The precipitation trend in 1450-1850 CE had a different pattern with a drying trend in the west of the Caspian Sea and overall getting less wet compared with the first period. Temperature showed cooling trends for both periods with the largest values happening in the northern regions. The North Atlantic sea surface temperature cooling and the subsequent change in atmospheric circulation played a role in the wetting and cooling of West Asia. In the second part of the study, we remove the trends and discuss the multi-clecadal variability of West Asian climate. It was found that Atlantic multi-decadal and Pacific decadal oscillations strongly contributed to West Asian temperature variability. For West Asian precipitation variability, we found remote connections with the Nordic seas and tropical Pacific Ocean.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2020. Vol. 57, no 1, p. 102-113
Keywords [en]
climate modelling, last millennium, West Asia, Middle East
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-178649DOI: 10.1139/cjes-2018-0216ISI: 000505672300008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-178649DiVA, id: diva2:1396866
Available from: 2020-02-26 Created: 2020-02-26 Last updated: 2020-02-26Bibliographically approved

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