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Re-etymologizing Russian cultural vocabulary in Yukaghir as mediated by the Yakut
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German.
Number of Authors: 12019 (English)In: Turkic languages, ISSN 1431-4983, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 222-249Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, a group of thirty-five Yukaghir words describing fairly recently borrowed Russian cultural vocabulary is re-etymologized. Most of these words, which are from various Yukaghir languages and dialects, but mainly of the Tundra Yukaghir variety, have previously been given loanword etymologies as direct Russian borrowings. However, phonological considerations clearly demonstrate that this is a false assumption, and it is suggested that instead all of these words have been borrowed into Yukaghir from Yakut as an intermediary language. All the Yukaghir words show signs of Yakut phonology, but are ultimately of Russian origin, sometimes from north-eastern dialectal forms (having earlier been borrowed into Yakut). Schematically, all of these re-etymologized words can be described as: Russian > Yakut > Yukaghir. Semantically, the words describe various modern concepts covering areas such as the household, cooking, culture and society, bureaucracy and healthcare. This amply demonstrates that Yukaghirs, in particular Tundra Yukaghirs, have lived in a bi-, tri- or even more diverse multilingual environment (of Yukaghir, Yakut, Russian, etc.) at least during the last few centuries. Further, some of the Yakut words for Russian concepts have been borrowed into Ewen or Ewenki, instead of directly from Russian, which is evident from both the phonology and semantics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 23, no 2, p. 222-249
Keywords [en]
Cultural vocabulary, Yakut, Yukaghir, Russian, Tungusic, dialectology
National Category
Languages and Literature
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-179726ISI: 000512831800008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-179726DiVA, id: diva2:1411652
Available from: 2020-03-04 Created: 2020-03-04 Last updated: 2020-03-04Bibliographically approved

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Piispanen, Peter Sauli
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