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Secondary Stroke Prevention After Ischemic Stroke in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementia Disorders
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Number of Authors: 92020 (English)In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 73, no 3, p. 1013-1021Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Recurrent ischemic stroke (IS) increases the risk of cognitive decline. To lower the risk of recurrent IS, secondary prevention is essential. Objective: Our aim was to compare post-discharge secondary IS prevention and its maintenance up to 3 years after first IS in patients with and without Alzheimer's disease and other dementia disorders. Methods: Prospective open-cohort study 2007-2014 from the Swedish national dementia registry (SveDem) and the Swedish national stroke registry (Riksstroke). Patients with dementia who experienced an IS (n = 1410; 332 [23.5%] with Alzheimer's disease) were compared with matched non-dementia IS patients (n = 7150). We analyzed antiplatelet, anticoagulant, blood pressure lowering, and statin treatment as planned medication initiation at discharge and actual dispensation of medications at first, second, and third year post-stroke. Results: At discharge, planned initiation of medication was higher in patients with dementia compared to non-dementia patients for antiplatelets (OR with 95% CI for fully adjusted models 1.23 [1.02-1.48]) and lower for blood pressure lowering medication (BPLM; 0.57 [0.49-0.67]), statins (0.57 [0.50-0.66]), and anticoagulants (in patients with atrial fibrillation - AF; 0.41 [0.32-0.53]). When analysis for antiplatelets was stratified according to the presence of AF, ORs for receiving antiplatelets remained significant only in the presence of AF (in the presence of AF 1.56 [1.21-2.01], in patients without AF 0.99 [0.75-1.33]). Similar trends were observed in 1st, 2nd, and 3rd year post-stroke. Conclusions: Dementia was a predictor of lower statin and BPLM use. Patients with dementia and AF were more likely to be prescribed antiplatelets and less likely to receive anticoagulants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2020. Vol. 73, no 3, p. 1013-1021
Keywords [en]
Alzheimer's disease, anticoagulants, antihypertensive agents, cohort studies, dementia, hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors, ischemic stroke, platelet aggregation inhibitors, secondary prevention
National Category
Geriatrics Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-179644DOI: 10.3233/JAD-191011ISI: 000512319400016PubMedID: 31884483OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-179644DiVA, id: diva2:1412575
Available from: 2020-03-06 Created: 2020-03-06 Last updated: 2020-03-06Bibliographically approved

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