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Food, mobility and health in an Arctic 17th-18th century mining population
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0332-7351
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Archaeological Research Laboratory.
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(English)In: Arctic, ISSN 0004-0843, E-ISSN 1923-1245Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

The silver mine of Nasafjäll and the smeltery site in Silbojokk in Swedish Sápmi were established in 1635 and was used during several phases until the late 19th century. Excavations in Silbojokk, c. 40 km from Nasafjäll have revealed buildings, such as a smeltery, living houses, a bakery, a church with a churchyard. Already at the start, both local and non-local individuals worked at the mine and the smel-tery. Non-locals were recruited to work in the mine and at the smel-tery, and the local Sámi population was recruited to transport the sil-ver down to the Swedish coast. Females, males and children of differ-ent ages were represented among the individuals buried at the church-yard in Silbojokk, used between c. 1635 and 1770. Here we study diet, mobility and exposure to lead in the smeltery workers, the miners and the local population. By employing isotopic analysis, δ13C, δ15N, δ34S, 87/86Sr and elemental composition, we have demonstrated that individ-uals in Silbojokk had a homogenous diet, except for two individuals. In addition, there were local and non-local individuals, and all of them were exposed to lead, that in some cases could have caused death. The environment at Nasafjäll and Silbojokk is still highly toxic.

Keywords [en]
Arctic mining, Sápmi, δ13C, δ15N, δ34S and 87/86Sr, Pb, diet, mobility, colonialism
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Archaeological Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-179985OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-179985DiVA, id: diva2:1415587
Funder
Berit Wallenberg Foundation, BWS 2015.0073
Note

Yttelrigare finansiärer:

Göran Gustafssons stiftelse för natur och kultur i Lappland, projekt # 1507

Grupos con Potencial de Crecemento, project " ED431B

Norrbotten County Board

Available from: 2020-03-19 Created: 2020-03-19 Last updated: 2020-03-22Bibliographically approved
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