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A nationwide, population‐based study of school grades, delayed graduation, and qualification for school years 10‐12, in children with brain tumors in Sweden
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education. Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4027-8053
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
2020 (English)In: Pediatric Blood & Cancer, ISSN 1545-5009, E-ISSN 1545-5017, Vol. 67, no 2, article id e28014Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

As many as 95.7% of children diagnosed with a brain tumor will experience persistent late effects as adults. These include difficulties with general executive functions, lower IQ, and mental fatigue, which may negatively affect school performance.

Methods

Through the Swedish Childhood Cancer Registry, we identified 475 children born between 1988 and 1996, diagnosed with a brain tumor before their 15th birthday. School grades in “Swedish,” “mathematics,” and “English,” if their graduation was delayed, and qualification for school years 10‐12 were compared with 2197 matched controls. Furthermore, we checked for interaction effects between sex and age at diagnosis, and possible effects of tumor grade (high or low) as well as parents’ education.

Results

Children treated for a brain tumor performed worse in the subjects compared to controls and also had delayed graduation to a greater extent. Fewer children treated for a brain tumor than controls qualified for school years 10‐12. Children treated at a young age, especially females, and children whose parents have low education seem to be at particular risk. Unexpectedly, there were no differences in outcomes between survivors with high‐ and low‐grade tumors.

Conclusions

It is important that schools provide regular pedagogical assessment and individualized support to meet the different needs of children treated for a brain tumor. Children treated for low‐grade tumors do not perform better than children treated for high‐grade tumors, despite the lighter treatment, and hence require the same attention and support.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2020. Vol. 67, no 2, article id e28014
Keywords [en]
brain tumor, delayed graduation, qualification for school year 10-12, registry-based study, school grades year 9
National Category
Educational Sciences Pediatrics
Research subject
Special Education
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-180177DOI: 10.1002/pbc.28014OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-180177DiVA, id: diva2:1415720
Available from: 2020-03-19 Created: 2020-03-19 Last updated: 2020-03-19Bibliographically approved

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