Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Concurrent affective and linguistic prosody with the same emotional valence elicits a late positive ERP response
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
Number of Authors: 32020 (English)In: European Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0953-816X, E-ISSN 1460-9568Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Change in linguistic prosody generates a mismatch negativity response (MMN), indicating neural representation of linguistic prosody, while change in affective prosody generates a positive response (P3a), reflecting its motivational salience. However, the neural response to concurrent affective and linguistic prosody is unknown. The present paper investigates the integration of these two prosodic features in the brain by examining the neural response to separate and concurrent processing by electroencephalography (EEG). A spoken pair of Swedish words-['fa:s epsilon n] phase and ['fa:s epsilon n] damn-that differed in emotional semantics due to linguistic prosody was presented to 16 subjects in an angry and neutral affective prosody using a passive auditory oddball paradigm. Acoustically matched pseudowords['va:s epsilon m] and ['va:s epsilon m]-were used as controls. Following the constructionist concept of emotions, accentuating the conceptualization of emotions based on language, it was hypothesized that concurrent affective and linguistic prosody with the same valence-angry ['fa:s epsilon n] damn-would elicit a unique late EEG signature, reflecting the temporal integration of affective voice with emotional semantics of prosodic origin. In accordance, linguistic prosody elicited an MMN at 300-350 ms, and affective prosody evoked a P3a at 350-400 ms, irrespective of semantics. Beyond these responses, concurrent affective and linguistic prosody evoked a late positive component (LPC) at 820-870 ms in frontal areas, indicating the conceptualization of affective prosody based on linguistic prosody. This study provides evidence that the brain does not only distinguish between these two functions of prosody but also integrates them based on language and experience.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2020.
Keywords [en]
electroencephalography, emotion, event-related potential, language, prosody
National Category
Neurosciences Languages and Literature
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-179592DOI: 10.1111/ejn.14658ISI: 000509972400001PubMedID: 31872480OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-179592DiVA, id: diva2:1416434
Available from: 2020-03-23 Created: 2020-03-23 Last updated: 2020-03-23

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Zora, HaticeRudner, MaryMagnusson, Anna K. Montell
By organisation
Department of Linguistics
In the same journal
European Journal of Neuroscience
NeurosciencesLanguages and Literature

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf